Public Health Canada and Glyphosate
Note: Glyphosate is an active ingredient in RoundUp & Agent Orange

"Yes, I'm afraid for my health . . .
For that of my grandson too."

Man with dangerous glyphosate levels

Photo & article by Acadie Nouvelle

Glyphosate is found everywhere. Little wonder, since it is the most widely used herbicide in the world. But it is not only necessary in agricultural spreading and weeding. Recent studies show that this potentially carcinogenic molecule is hidden in several foods that we consume daily. Cereals, bread, fruits, vegetables and more. Now imagine when you find it your urine!

It was the unpleasant surprise that a citizen of Maltempec, near Paquetville, received as a "birthday present." Roger St-Pierre welcomed us to his home, in his garage converted into a resting place, on Thursday. The 65-year-old is in high spirits, despite the wake-up call received from his family doctor on February 25. On his birthday. Welcome to the family of the poisoned! He laughs.

With medical documents in hand, he says he has become "living proof" that this controversial element, banned in many countries and indicted by the World Health Organization, has contaminated his body.

A lifelong environmentalist, Mr. St-Pierre began his crusade when he requested a routine blood test in October. But he wanted to go further . . . and asked for a glyphosate test in [his] urine. "My doctor told me it was the first time he had heard this, but he chose to go ahead," he begins.

"It was not easy," he continues. He had to be patient and put pressure on certain medical authorities to finally succeed in sending, not without difficulty, a sample to the Center de toxicology du Quebec.

"It took me a month and a half of battle and wrangling before I got a positive response. I was told that I was one of the first in the country to demand that. I took the test in Bathurst in mid-December, but Quebec didn't receive it until a month later. Then, on my birthday, I got my results," he says, showing us a copy provided by the Center de toxicology du Quebec. It states there are 3.8 micrograms of glyphosate per liter in Mr. St-Pierre's urine.

"My doctor told me that this rate was very high ..."

The question in all of this is what "very high" really means. Health Canada sets widely varying maximum residue limits for this herbicide in many foods derived from treated animals and in substances contained in veterinary drugs.

The national body maintains that the acceptable daily intake of 0.3 mg / kg bw / day (milligram per kilogram of body weight per day) for glyphosate for the assessment of risk to human health, according to the document regarding Health Canada's proposed re-evaluation decision.

"Although this intake is a benchmark for health protection, it is important to note that it is an external measure of the amount of a specific substance from the diet (i.e. (d. food or drinking water consumed) that can be ingested on a daily basis for a lifetime without appreciable risk to health. Health Canada has confirmed that there are no risks of concern to human health when the product is used according to label directions," said Maryse Durette, Health Canada Media Relations.

. In a 2017 article in the French newspaper Le Monde, the association rations futures set the acceptable standard at 0.1 microgram per liter of urine.

Mr. St-Pierre's case would then be equivalent to 38 times the allowable limit. "An attendant from the Center called me to ask if I had worked in an environment containing glyphosate or handled this product. I did not know this before Boucher (spokesperson against glyphosate in the Acadian Peninsula) started his fight. I am told this is a cumulative effect," continues our commenter.

As soon as he received this response, Mr. St-Pierre decided to purge his pantry and get rid of anything that might contain glyphosate. Today, he eats organic. He drinks organic too. And he would like others to follow his example. Not necessarily for him, but especially for the next generations.

"Yes, I'm afraid for my health," he said eventually. "For that of my grandson too. This is why I consume as much organic as I can. I believe to be living proof that glyphosate can get into a body. Do I want to go further? Perhaps. If my case convinces 1000 people to take this test, it will already be that. It should be as common as a cholesterol test. Today, I am leading the way. I trust others will follow."

Until then, Roger St-Pierre is taking life on the safe side. A glass of organic wine in hand. Without glyphosate, of course.

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Testing for Glyphosate & More
The Great Plains Laboratory, Inc is a company in the US that will send a water or urine test kit for $99.

Do you trust that Health Canada monitors ALL foods for glyphosate to ensure your body contains levels below acceptable daily intake of 0.3 mg / kg bw / day (milligram per kilogram of body weight per day)? How can they do this and tell us our bodies are not at risk? Glyphosate is in everything and Health Canada does not provide a test. Glyphosate causes cancer. It should be easy to obtain a test from your family doctor.

The following is correspondence with Robert Martin, Regulatory Information Officer, Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA), Health Canada / Government of Canada.

Health Canada also establishes maximum residue limits (MRLs) for pesticide residues for each food use. These MRLs are set at levels well below the amount that could pose a health concern. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) works very closely with the PMRA to ensure that the foods available on the Canadian market are compliant with the MRLs. Activities include testing of fresh fruits, vegetables, grains, pulses, and oil seeds that are domestically produced, and monitoring of imported foods including dried pulse crops such as dried beans, peas and lentils. The results to date show a high degree of compliance with the MRLs established by Health Canada's PMRA."

Sent: 2020-09-11 4:56 PM
To: Info SC, HC Info (HC/SC)
Subject: glyphosate

Hello
How can I get my body tested to see how much glyphosate might be accumulated in my body?
Thank you, Sydnee

Sent: 2020-09-14 12:21 PM
From: Info SC, HC Info (HC/SC)
Subject: RE: glyphosate

Thank you for contacting Health Canada.
Your recent enquiry has been redirected to the appropriate area for a response.
Sincerely, Health Canada
Ottawa, Canada K1A 0K9
info@hc-sc.gc.ca
Telephone | Téléphone 613-957-2991 / Toll free | Sans frais 1 866-225-0709
Government of Canada | Gouvernement du Canada

Hello Sydnee,

Your email was forwarded to me. I am writing to you from Health Canada's Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA) which is responsible for the registration and regulation of pesticides in Canada.
Unfortunately, the PMRA cannot provide a response to your inquiry. You will need to contact a health care professional such as a doctor or specialist.
The PMRA thanks you for writing.
Robert Martin, Regulatory Information Officer
Pest Management Regulatory Agency
Health Canada / Government of Canada
HC.pmra.info-arla.SC@canada.ca
1-800-267-6315
613-736-3799

Good morning Robert,

So, you are telling me that Health Canada, I stress the word "Health" who permits the use of glyphosate in Canada has no idea how one can get tested to see how much has accumulated in their body? Health Canada does recommend that a person's level should be below an acceptable daily intake of 0.3 mg / kg bw / day (milligram per kilogram of body weight per day) for glyphosate for the assessment of risk to human health. You / they realize it is in most of the food we eat these days unless it is organic and non-GMO.

That added with the fact that businesses are allowed to spray it everywhere, farmers use it constantly, Health Canada, again I stress the word "health" should be able to tell us where we can get tested.

Below, I post a news story of a gentleman whose levels were way above normal. I am posting the Google translation along with a link to the story.
[Note: website viewers, please see yellow text box]

My question to you is: Are you telling me Health Canada has no idea where one can get tested to see what the levels of glyphosate is in their body? Health Canada is telling me that I need to contact a health care professional such as a doctor or specialist. Is that right?

This test should be widely available. The people of Canada should not have to spend months researching on how to get this testing. It should be included on the regular lab requisition. Everyone should have easy access to this testing.
I look forward to hearing back from you, Sydnee

Hello Sydney,

Your follow up email has now been forwarded to PMRA staff for review.
I hope to have a response for you shortly.
Robert Martin, Regulatory Information Officer
Pest Management Regulatory Agency
Health Canada / Government of Canada
HC.pmra.info-arla.SC@canada.ca
1-800-267-6315
613-736-3799

Hello Sydney,

PMRA staff have now reviewed your follow up email.
Provinces and territories deliver most of Canada's health care services and the medically necessary hospital and doctors' services, including specific blood tests, are determined by each individual provincial and territorial health insurance plan.

Regarding blood monitoring for pesticides, there are ongoing federally-led studies (see below) that do monitor for certain pesticides. However, the laboratories that conduct these analyses are not the same laboratories that do routine blood analyses for the general public.

The Canadian Health Measures Survey (CHMS) and the Maternal-Infant Research on Environmental Chemicals (MIREC) are the two main national biomonitoring programs in Canada. While these both operate under Health Canada's Chemical Management Plan, the surveys and data collection are managed by Statistics Canada. Overall, CHMS data indicate pesticide exposure levels are lower than or similar to those predicted by the standard assessment. As well, the Canadian biomonitoring results are similar to those from the biomonitoring component of the United States National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey (NHANES).

For more information on these studies, please refer to the following links: www.statcan.gc.ca and www.mirec-canada.ca

Before a pesticide is approved for use in Canada, it must undergo a thorough science-based risk assessment, which includes both hazard and exposure characterization, to determine if it meets strict health and environmental standards. In order to evaluate the health risks from potential pesticide residues in food and water, an extensive body of scientific data are evaluated by Health Canada scientists. These data quantify the potential level of specific pesticide residues, such as glyphosate, in foods derived from both plants and animals, based on how the product is to be used on crops, and considers many factors including maximum rates, timing and number of pesticide applications.

The dietary risk assessment for glyphosate calculated the potential total human dietary exposure based on Canadian diets, to determine if risks are acceptable (i.e., that the level of dietary exposure is less than or equal to the amount that is considered to be acceptable when consumed daily over a lifetime). High-end values are used in these assessments so as not to underestimate exposure. Pesticides are registered for use in Canada only if the level of exposure to Canadians does not cause any harmful effects, including gastrointestinal effects, cancer, or other effects. In the case of glyphosate, dietary exposure estimates for various population subgroups range from 12% to 70% of the acceptable limit and, therefore, there are no dietary risks of concern.

Health Canada also establishes maximum residue limits (MRLs) for pesticide residues for each food use. These MRLs are set at levels well below the amount that could pose a health concern. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) works very closely with the PMRA to ensure that the foods available on the Canadian market are compliant with the MRLs. Activities include testing of fresh fruits, vegetables, grains, pulses, and oil seeds that are domestically produced, and monitoring of imported foods including dried pulse crops such as dried beans, peas and lentils. The results to date show a high degree of compliance with the MRLs established by Health Canada's PMRA.

For more information on glyphosate in Canada please refer to: Canada fact sheets
The PMRA thanks you for writing, Robert Martin
Regulatory Information Officer
Pest Management Regulatory Agency
Health Canada / Government of Canada
HC.pmra.info-arla.SC@canada.ca
1-800-267-6315
613-736-3799

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