Nova Scotia species-at-risk

Adam J Malcolm, member of the Stop Clearcutting Unama'ki (Cape Breton) facebook group, put a file together of a dozen species in Nova Scotia "whose declining fortunes are due, at least in part, to declining forest health."

Nova Scotia mainland moose JanChr photo

"Vulnerable to habitat fragmentation"

Nova Scotia flying squirrels

The flying squirrel habitat is becoming increasingly fragmented and degraded by industrial clearcutting, which spells trouble for these little nighttime wonders. Video 1:20

Video by Adam J Malcolm
Stop Clearcutting Unama'ki (Cape Breton)
facebook group

Nova Scotia Species-at-Risk

Nova Scotia species at risk

The Pine, or American Marten is struggling in Nova Scotia due to loss of habitat.
Raising awareness about the species we're losing in Nova Scotia and beyond
Follow on NSspecies@risk at instagram

The Gift that Keeps Giving!
One-fifth of all animal and plant species - about 6,000 in all - depend on dead wood.
Removing dead wood destroys valuable habitats. Live wood is of no use to organisms that live in dead wood.

The Hidden Life of Trees
Forester & Author, Peter Wohlleben

Nova Scotia species at risk

In Nova Scotia only about 40 breeding pairs of Piping Plovers remain. These birds are dispersed around the province on 17 sand beaches. Despite concerted conservation efforts here and elsewhere in North America, the numbers of this species remain low. The main reasons for this include: deterioration of marginal nesting habitat due to natural events (storms, vegetation succession), human alteration of beach habitat, human disturbance during nesting and predation by birds and mammals on eggs and young.

Click for more Nova Scotia details:
Legally Listed Endangered Species

Photo by Mark Elderkin
Biologist, Species at Risk
Wildlife Division
NS Department of Lands and Forestry

Mainland Moose
Conservation Status in Nova Scotia: Critically endangered

Habitat:
Unfragmented forests of various ages.
Ecosystem services:
Shapes ecosystems through selective browsing; traditional subsistence food source Reasons for decline:
Habitat loss and fragmentation; disease; logging road building to clearcuts leading to increased disturbance and poaching.

Nova Scotia Canada Lynx US Fish & Wildlife photo

Canada Lynx
Conservation Status in Nova Scotia: Endangered

Habitat:
Coniferous forest with abundant Snowshoe Hare.
Ecosystem services:
Compete with Coyote for Snowshoe Hare
Reasons for decline:
Habitat destruction and fragmentation; trapping; disease.

American Marten, Nova Scotia Tatiana Gettelman photo

American Marten
Conservation Status in Nova Scotia: Critically endangered

Habitat: Mature forest.
Ecosystem services:
Consumes mice and voles, keeping numbers in check
Reasons for decline:
Habitat destruction and degradation. There are likely fewer than 50 in the province.

Nova Scotia rusty blackbird DaveInman photo

Rusty Blackbird
Conservation Status in Nova Scotia: Endangered

Habitat:
Wet, coniferous forests and bogs. Ecosystem services:
Rusty blackbirds consume flies, ants and wasps, helping to keep numbers in check.
Reasons for decline:
Habitat loss and deliberate poisoning.

Nova Scotia Bicknell's Thrush KP McFarland photo

Bicknell's Thrush
Conservation Status in Nova Scotia: Endangered

Habitat:
Upland coniferous forest
Ecosystem services:
Consumes ants and flies, helping to keep numbers in check; disseminate wild fruit seeds
Reasons for decline:
Habitat loss and degradation; air pollution.

Nova Scotia Canada Warbler Kelly Colgan Azar photo

Canada Warbler
Conservation Status in Nova Scotia: Endangered

Habitat:
Mixed coniferous and deciduous forests with shrubby, mossy understory.
Ecosystem services:
Consumes insects and spiders, keeping numbers in check Reasons for decline:
Habitat loss and degradation.

Nova Scotia Chimney Swift eschipul photo

Chimney Swift
Conservation Status in Nova Scotia: Critically endangered

Habitat:
Large hollow trees and chimneys
Ecosystem services:
Consumes flies, ants, wasps, aphids, helping to keep numbers in check Reasons for decline:
Loss of Old Growth Forests, with suitable nesting sites; pesticides.

Nova Scotia Bank Swallow Shawn McCready photo

Bank Swallow
Conservation Status in Nova Scotia: Critically endangered

Habitat:
Brook and river banks; lake and ocean bluffs.
Ecosystem services:
Consume and enourmous amount of flies, ants and wasps, helping to keep their numbers in check. Reasons for decline:
Road building and pesticide use.

Stop Clearcutting Nova Scotia